The Netherlands has launched a plan to build the world’s largest array of floating solar panels. Thus, the country not only raises the level of “green” generation but also struggles with sea level rising.

The project consists of 15 “solar islands” at the Andij reservoir in North Holland, which will include 73,500 photovoltaic panels. According to the World Economic Forum, these islands will be the first large-scale objects in the world that can adapt to the movement of the sun.

“It is no coincidence that such an adaptation was born in the Netherlands, as people there already live below sea level,” says Arno Van Druten, head of Floating Solar, a solar panel supplier for the project. “We are struggling with rising sea levels through the construction of ever-higher dams or houseboats.” That is why we decided to move the installation of solar panels from roofs and ground to water – we are adapting to rising water levels. We can also experiment with the transfer of entire residential areas to water that will be energy-positive or at least neutral. ”

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Due to trackers, floating photo modules face almost the entire daylight at an optimal angle to the sun. According to the developers, the sun tracking system includes three buoys attached to the anchor using a cable that rotates and simultaneously holds the structure together. A special algorithm automatically controls the position of the planes of the solar panels and turns the island to the desired position.

“You need to make the system flexible so that it can adapt to the vibrations of the waves, and at the same time, the panels can act as sails,” adds Van Druten. “Since we can turn the island after the sun, this gives us an additional advantage – the ability to put it in a position in which it does not suffer from strong winds.”

“You need to make the system flexible so that it can adapt to wave vibrations, and at the same time, the panels can act as sails,” adds Van Druten. “Since we can turn the island towards the sun, this gives us an additional advantage – the ability to put it in a position in which it does not suffer from strong winds.”

Floating solar power plants are also being built in Japan, China, Chile and the UK. Ramez Naam, the co-chair of the Department of Energy and Environment at the University of the Singularity, says that ultimately, cost savings and land scarcity will stimulate the development of surface SES technologies and attract more attention from different governments.

Floating solar power plants are also being built in Japan, China, Chile and the UK. Ramez Naam, the co-chair of the Department of Energy and Environment at the University of the Singularity, says that ultimately, cost savings and land scarcity will stimulate the development of surface SES technologies and attract more attention from different governments.

“In places where there is little space on land, like in Japan, solar power plants on the water are a great way to apply it in areas where it was previously impossible to do,” explains Naam. – Water provides cooling and solar panels increase their efficiency, and as a result generate more electricity. Besides, solar installations above water can reduce evaporation losses in ponds, canals and other bodies of water. ”

According to Naam, in some southern countries, it is cheaper to use solar energy than electricity from burning coal or gas. It’s already more economical for them to build and operate solar and wind parks, rather than relying on hydrocarbons.

source – here